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Friday, October 28
 

3:30pm

Registration
Registration will take place on the 2nd floor of the ELC on the uphill side of the building. Please follow signs to registration posted in the ELC.

Friday October 28, 2016 3:30pm - 6:30pm
Elaine Langone Center (ELC) 701 Moore Ave, Lewisburg, PA 17837

4:00pm

Campus Tour
Join us for a tour of campus. If you plan on attending the tour, please email Matt Gardzina, Director of Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship, (mkg013 at bucknell dot edu) to confirm. The tour will begin at 4PM, in the lobby of the Weis Center and will include stops at the Bertrand Library and the Electronics Maker-E Space in Dana Engineering.

Moderators
avatar for Matt Gardzina

Matt Gardzina

Director, Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship, Bucknell University
As Director of Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship at Bucknell University I am responsible for providing leadership, direction, planning, and oversight for the wide-range of outreach, consultation, instruction and support programs of the Educational Technology work group including digital pedagogy, digital scholarship, and focused programs in GIS and video. | | I came to Bucknell from The College of Wooster where I served as Director of... Read More →

Friday October 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Weis Center

5:30pm

Opening Reception
Join us for an opening reception in the Samek Art Museum.

Friday October 28, 2016 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Samek Art Museum 3rd Floor, ELC

6:30pm

Dinner and #kn1: Keynote Address
#kn1: "Digital Sociology" Tressie McMillan Cottom (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Speakers
avatar for Param Bedi

Param Bedi

Vice President for Library and Information Technology, Bucknell University
Param Bedi is the Vice President for Library and Information Technology at Bucknell University. He joined Bucknell in January 2008. Param is the chief strategist and visionary for comprehensive library/information technology planning and implementation, in support of the University's mission. He provides leadership in creating an environment that energizes and extends library and technology support for the learning, teaching, scholarly, and... Read More →
TM

Tressie McMillan Cottom

Virginia Commonwealth University


Friday October 28, 2016 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Terrace Room Second Floor, ELC
 
Saturday, October 29
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Saturday October 29, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am
Terrace Room Second Floor, ELC

8:30am

#s1a: Reframing Art History Through Digital Approaches
Viewing the Global through a Local Lens. Student and Faculty Scholars Explore the Collections in Packwood House in Lewisburg, PA
Janice Mann, Rebecca Reeve, Nicole Adams, and Ariel Senackerib (Bucknell University)

The Packwood House Museum in Lewisburg, PA houses the paintings and works of art collected by Edith Hedges Kelly Fetherston, an artistic women who fancied herself to be a less prominent version of Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner. Born in Lewisburg, PA in 1885 but living most of her life elsewhere, Fetherston returned to her birthplace with her husband John in 1936.  Shortly, thereafter John and Edith decided to make their home into a museum for Edith’s paintings and the array of objects that they collected on their travels and at home.  While the couple were alive, only friends were allowed to view the collection but after Edith’s death in 1976, the house became a museum open to the general public.

This summer three art history students–Nicole Adams, Rebecca Reeve and Ariel Senackerib–and I will examine Edith Fetherston’s paintings, letters, postcards, and the objects she collected using various digital tools.  Nicole intends to create a digital tour in Slate that utilizes excerpts from Fetherston’s diaries and postcards in combination with selected objects from the collection to restore the collector’s voice to the objects and to reveal her curatorial decisions. Ariel’s project explores the “exotic” features of Fetherston’s paintings and their sources with the intent of revealing the artist’s attitude towards and understanding of Asia.  Her essay on this subject will introduce a complete digital catalog of the paintings which she will create this summer.  Finally, Rebecca will take on the daunting task of creating a digital archive of the personal papers and ephemera in the Packwood House archive.  We anticipate that the archive will reveal much about the public and private lives of an upper class couple with artistic interests, who engaged deeply with the world outside of their small town.  These projects, each valuable in its own right, will also survive my research project which will examine Edith Fetherston within the broader contexts of female collectors and artists, and the concept of the “artistic” woman in the early twentieth-century United States.


Digital Tools and Physical Objects: Connecting Museums, Teaching, and Scholarship through Art History Teaching Resources
Renee McGarry (Sotheby’s Institute of Art)

This presentation will highlight specific entries on the AHTR Weekly blog and in our lesson plan project that have bridged the divide between academic art history, museums, and K-12 classrooms. These include entries on the AHTR Weekly concerning one of the largest Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thons in the country and how the same principles were applied in a classroom, the differences between mentoring for those teaching in museums and those teaching in the university, the connections between lesson plans about the Near East and Islam and contemporary violence committed by ISIS, and the suggestions made by the College Board to revitalize AP art history and how they can be applied to higher education. We will end by discussing how the relationship between AHTR and its recently launched online open access journal, Art History Pedagogy and Practice, can serve as a means of connecting museum education, teaching, and scholarship further by offering a means by which the majority of academic labor, as seen through the lens of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), can be taken seriously in university systems and beyond.


Moderators
CP

Courtney Paddick

Librarian for the Arts and Humanities, Bucknell University

Speakers
NA

Nicole Adams

Bucknell University
JM

Janice Mann

Bucknell
RM

Renee McGarry

Art History Teaching Resources
RR

Rebecca Reeve

Bucknell University
AS

Ariel Senackerib

Bucknell University


Saturday October 29, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Walls Lounge 2nd Floor, ELC

8:30am

#s1b: Building Bridges: Collaborating Within and Across Institutions
Crossing Institutional Boundaries to Create a Collaborative Digital Archives: The Collegewomen.org Project
Eric Pumroy (Bryn Mawr College), Joanna DiPasquale (Vassar College), and Beth Seltzer (Bryn Mawr College)

The Collegewomen.org project is a collaborative effort by the colleges once known as the Seven Sisters to create a portal that brings together the institutions’ extensive collections of letters, diaries and scrapbooks that document the lives of the first generations of women to attend college. Funded by a planning grant from the NEH in 2014 and an implementation grant in 2016, the project aims to stimulate significant new work in women’s history and encourage a greater understanding of the role that women’s colleges played in advancing the position of women in American society. The session will examine both the work required to build and sustain a collaborative digital archive, the technical challenges to overcome in building a multi-institutional resource, and the additional outreach and supplemental content that is needed to make the digital archive a productive tool for research and teaching.


Erasing Borders Through Digital Discovery: EXPLORE Chicago Collections as the Foundation for Collaboration Among Libraries, Archives, Museums (and Others)
Tracy J. Seneca (University of Illinois at Chicago), Ellen Keith (Chicago History Museum), and Scott Walter (DePaul University)

In November 2015, Chicago Collections launched its foundational digital project, EXPLORE Chicago Collections, a “one-stop shop” providing access to primary source materials (and expertise) to citizens, students, and scholars with an interest in primary source collections related to the City of Chicago and its people. EXPLORE Chicago Collections provides access to more than 100,000 digital images and more than 4,000 finding aids to archival collections held at Chicago Collections member institutions, including academic libraries, public libraries, museums, historical societies, and other cultural heritage institutions. The initial release of EXPLORE Chicago Collections is not only “foundational” in the sense that work continues on the development of the portal, but in the sense that shared access to primary source content and expertise provides the foundation for a swiftly-expanding array of service programs, including, to date, a cooperative reference service, public exhibitions, public lecture series, professional development opportunities for staff, and a research partnership with Chicago’s public radio affiliate. Chicago Collections members will discuss the design of this new approach to collaboration among cultural heritage institutions of all types across a metropolitan area and describe some of the programs and services currently under consideration for the next phase of its development.

Moderators
IO

Isabella O'Neill

Bucknell University

Speakers
JD

Joanna DiPasquale

Vassar College
EK

Ellen Keith

Chicago History Museum
EP

Eric Pumroy

Bryn Mawr College
BS

Beth Seltzer

Bryn Mawr College
avatar for Tracy Seneca

Tracy Seneca

University of Illinois at Chicago


Saturday October 29, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Center Room 2nd Floor, ELC

8:30am

#s1c: Exploring LGBTQIA+ Communities through Digital Landscapes
Bridging the Gap Between University Archives and Diverse Publics with Digital Tools
Elise Chenier and Mary Corbett (Simon Fraser University)

Both oral history and LGBTQ archives have, since the early 1970s, served as tools to empower grass-roots, marginalized communities. As such, they have traditionally been driven by community-based imperatives, as well as community labour. Today, however, in the United States and Canada there are more LGBTQ collections housed in universities than there are in grass-roots archives. The Archives of Lesbian Oral Testimony (ALOT) is one such archives. In this preliminary research presentation, I describe our current Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) funded project, “Bridging the Gap,” which explores how empowering users by making them “first class entities in the system” might bridge the gap between community and university and democratize knowledge. We propose that analyses of forms of user engagement can guide the archives’ development, and in this way provide services, information, and tools relevant and useful to diverse communities, including especially everyday lesbians and queer women.


Inside/Outside the Binary: Teaching the Politics of Data
Jacob Alden Sargent and Christopher Gilman (Occidental College)

At Occidental, we are experimenting with the integration of quantitative reasoning into courses outside of STEM. Students, often without prompting or explicit guidance from faculty, are conducting online surveys, generating data visualizations, and downloading large public data sets in their own research. Given that big data is driving decision-making from the LAPD’s use of “predictive policing” to deploy helicopters, to OKCupid’s manipulation of user experience to study human sexuality, we argue that quantitative literacy — in the form of critical evaluation of how data are constructed and used — is quintessentially humanistic, and thus could be considered a key component of a digitally inflected liberal arts curriculum.

Guided by this programmatic interest in quantitative literacy in the liberal arts, this interactive presentation zooms in on the design process for one inquiry-based course on non-normative gender identities and the politics of counting and classification. The course involves a class-wide research project that designs measures for non-binary gender identities and collaboratively analyzes the gender diversity of the campus. From this singular prototype, we derive some overall principles for the design of inquiry-based courses that aim to cultivate a critical approach to data collection and the quantification of human experience.


Moderators
DJ

Diane Jakacki

Bucknell University

Speakers
EC

Elise Chenier

Simon Fraser University
MC

Mary Corbett

Simon Fraser University
CG

Christopher Gilman

Occidental College
JA

Jacob Alden Sargent

Occidental College


Saturday October 29, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Room 241 2nd Floor, ELC

10:00am

Break
Saturday October 29, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Hallway Outside 241 2nd Floor, ELC

10:30am

#s2a: Re-Envisioning and Reclaiming History
The Collinwood Fire: Steampunk, Non-Fiction, and Historical Haiku
Michael Newbury and Daniel Houghton (Middlebury College)

Though mostly forgotten today, the Collinwood  School fire of 1908 killed 172 grade-school children and raised an international clamor for the redesign of school buildings.  A team of faculty, staff, and students at Middlebury College have tied together short computer-animated movie, archival footage, advertisements, and photographs to create a multimedia platform for nonfiction storytelling about the fire and events surrounding it.  Far from aspiring to conclusiveness, the project highlights the uncertainties of  understanding that emerged in the past and what can only be partially known in the present, as narration shifts between the real and the and the animated, the photographic and the computer-generated, historical sources and their limitations.


Public Humanities, Early American Studies, and the Digital Revolution
Jim Egan and Patrick Rashleigh (Brown University)

Can the digital turn in humanities scholarship produce more fruitful engagements between post-secondary institutions and the many publics that exist outside the academy? To engage this and related questions, this presentation will focus on Mapping Colonial American Publishing (http://cds.library.brown.edu/mapping-genres/), a collaborative project that uses library catalog data from two of Brown’s rare book libraries to visualize the history of publishing in the Americas before 1800.  Our recent efforts at engaging audiences beyond the academy has produced as many questions as answers.  We’ve wondered, for instance, what topics might draw readers to a subject that often draws more yawns than clicks, and how we might we use the digital to connect with the world outside the academy through partnerships with local historic sites, coordinating with museums and local public humanities groups, for instance, and/or elementary, middle, and/or secondary schools in order to advance the goals of all communities involved?

Moderators
MS

Mark Sheftall

Bucknell University

Speakers
JE

Jim Egan

Brown University
MN

Michael Newbury

Middlebury College
EP

E. Patrick Rashleigh

Brown University


Saturday October 29, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Walls Lounge 2nd Floor, ELC

10:30am

#s2c: Defining Student Success through Digital Scholarship Initiatives
Library-led Digital Scholarship for Undergraduates at a Small Institution
R.C. Miessler, Lauren White, Keira Koch, and Julia Wall (Gettysburg College)

In the summer of 2016, Gettysburg College’s Musselman Library piloted the Digital Scholarship Summer Fellowship (DSSF), a library-led, student-centered introduction to digital scholarship.  The Fellowship, a 10-week, paid, summer program for rising sophomores and juniors, is programmatic, based on a curriculum designed to introduce the student fellows to digital tools, project management, documentation, and the philosophy behind digital scholarship. The Fellowship aimed to create a digital scholarship community of practice at Gettysburg College, collaborating with educational technologists and faculty engaged in digital scholarship to support the needs of the first cohort; in addition, the Fellowship supported the digital scholarship activities of students participating in other summer research programs.


Digital Humanities Summer Scholars: A Model for Undergraduate Engagement with DH
Sarah Morris, Tawfiq Alhamedi, Caroline Nawrocki, and Mila Temnyalova (Lafayette College)

In an effort to directly engage undergraduates in the digital humanities, Skillman Library, at Lafayette College, offers a competitive, intensive summer research internship for students interested in digital scholarship. During this six-week program, students create digital research projects of their own, engaging with digital tools, methodologies, and communities of practice. In this panel, we will talk about this model of undergraduate work in DH, the students explaining the process and educational outcomes through their own digital projects. Students in this program learned Python, wrote code, cleaned data, created maps from scratch, performed text analysis, topic modeling, and sound engineering. This program has developed into an incubator for students’ passion projects, and, consequently, a force in elevating undergraduate research and digital humanities at Lafayette. Ultimately, variations on this model could be employed at many kinds of institutions, and we would discuss both advantages and challenges to implementation on the instructor and student levels.

To read more about our program, follow this link: http://sites.lafayette.edu/dhss/


Moderators
avatar for Carrie Pirmann

Carrie Pirmann

Social Sciences Librarian, Bucknell University

Speakers
TA

Tawfiq Alhamedi

Lafayette College
KK

Keira Koch

Gettysburg College
avatar for R.C. Miessler

R.C. Miessler

Systems Librarian, Gettysburg College
R.C. Miessler is the Systems Librarian at Gettysburg College’s Musselman Library and coordinator of the library’s Digital Scholarship Working Group. A lifelong geek in all things religion and technology, he’s interested in how students and faculty can use technology to present and interpret humanities research, as well as exploring the intersection of gaming and digital humanities.
avatar for Sarah Morris

Sarah Morris

Research & Instruction Librarian, Lafayette College
CN

Caroline Nawrocki

Lafayette College
MT

Mila Temnyalova

Lafayette College
JW

Julia Wall

Gettysburg College
LW

Lauren White

Gettysburg College


Saturday October 29, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 241 2nd Floor, ELC

10:30am

s2b: Redefining Art through the Digital, Reframing the Digital Through Art
Privilege and Making Sense: Using Filmmaking to Find the Cracks in The World
Simon Tarr (University of South Carolina)

Art is often hailed as a way that people make sense of the complicated world around us. This process of “making sense” is also described in theoretical models that come from communications, information science, human computer interaction, and other disciplines. However, when it comes to figuring out new and complex processes, existing models do not adequately or specifically account for effects of culture or privilege on those processes or behaviors.

In this session, Professor Tarr examines the process of teaching the technically complex process of filmmaking–itself an industry of problematic representations and ongoing lack of visibility and recognition for less-privileged groups.


Digital Art and Queer Utopias
Richard Rinehart (Bucknell University, Samek Art Museum)

Queer communities are heralding a cultural turning point. From recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings, to “bathroom bills”, to the massacre in Orlando, queerness is central to current social and political debate. Current events can mire us in an unrelenting present that makes it hard to imagine a path beyond. However, a new generation of artists are asking; Where do we go from here? How are queer communities imagining and working toward a better world? How does digital art embody queer futurity? This talk looks at several art projects that take up digital modalities, queer coding, and the aesthetics of utopia.

 


Moderators
avatar for Brianna Derr

Brianna Derr

Instructional Technologist, Bucknell University
Brianna Derr is an Instructional Technologist Specializing in Video. She earned her BA from Penn State in Film/Video Communications and received her certificate in Digital Storytelling in the Spring of 2014 from the University of Colorado Denver in partnership with The Center for Digital Storytelling now called StoryCenter. Brianna works with students and faculty to integrate video and digital media into the course curriculum. What she... Read More →

Speakers
RR

Richard Rinehart

Bucknell University
ST

Simon Tarr

University of South Carolina


Saturday October 29, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Center Room 2nd Floor, ELC

12:00pm

Lunch and #kn2: Keynote Address
#kn2: “Power, Privilege, and the Imperative to Act in the Digital Age,” Safiya Noble (UCLA) 

Speakers
avatar for Safiya Umoja Noble

Safiya Umoja Noble

Assistant Prof., Information Studies, UCLA
Safiya Umoja Noble, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She conducts research in socio-cultural informatics; including feminist, historical and political-economic perspectives on computing platforms and software in the public interest. Her research is at the intersection of transnational culture and technology in the design and use of applications on the... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Terrace Room Second Floor, ELC

1:45pm

#w1: The College Course (of all things!) as the Basic Unit of Exchange in Collaborative Digital Scholarship Between Institutions
The College Course (of all things!) as the Basic Unit of Exchange in Collaborative Digital Scholarship Between Institutions
Christopher Gilman and Jacob Alden Sargent (Occidental College)

In the 2013-14 academic year, Occidental College launched a media display and web-based content sharing system called Global Crossroads. The centerpiece of a major campus renovation, the display system comprises 10 video screens, which are distributed in a 2-story media wall. It allows students, faculty, and staff of the College to author multimedia scholarly projects comprised of individual content resources.

At our BUDSC15 panel presentation “Who’s Listening? Creating Intentional Publics” we received strong interest in developing capacity for sharing and deploying the Global Crossroads system at other institutions. This led to a pilot of an inter-institutional course collaboration with Heidi Knoblauch at Bard College and subsequent working group to convene at this summer’s ILiADS conference at Hamilton College.

We propose a “works in progress” session to further develop inter-institutional collaboration by focusing on ways the Global Crossroads system, as well as other platforms, can be a means for sharing scholarly content across institutions, using the course, rather than a digital project, as the basic unit of connection. We situate this approach within a more general provocation: student work within digital projects is often either too constrained to be meaningful as a form of intellectual expression, or it lacks the sophistication to be presented to wide audiences. In addition, projects require work flows and management processes that add a layer of complexity to curriculum design; and idiosyncratic course structures make iterative improvements in digital pedagogy difficult.

We suggest that inter-institutional collaborations may be fostered by focusing on inquiry-based course collaborations around the collection and analysis of primary digital resources shared between institutions with common course goals, student learning activities and work products. Our presentation is intended to solicit interest in further collaboration on designing a unified template for an inquiry-based course involving undergraduate research in the curriculum, the fundamental elements of which would include: topic constraints, source materials, methods of inquiry, and sequenced processes of critical analysis and production.


Speakers
CG

Christopher Gilman

Occidental College
JA

Jacob Alden Sargent

Occidental College


Saturday October 29, 2016 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Walls Lounge 2nd Floor, ELC

1:45pm

#w2: Using Jupyter Notebooks to Build Code Literacy and Introduce Digital Humanities
Limited Capacity seats available

Using Jupyter Notebooks to Build Code Literacy and Introduce Digital Humanities
Matthew Lavin (University of Pittsburgh)

Anyone who has tried to learn a programming language can attest to the fact that working with code requires a way of thinking that many if not most people are not used to. If I miss a comma in Microsoft Word, my document will still print. If I forget the title of a book but describe its plot to my colleague, she will probably know the book I mean. If asked provided a date for a piece of correspondence, “November 190?” might be a reasonable designation. Coding, in contrast, requires a different kind of precision, which is often an early hurdle to teaching arts and humanities students basic programming skills.

Jupyter Notebooks are meant to facilitate “open source, interactive data science and scientific computing across over 40 programming languages” (Project Jupyter). A Jupyter Notebook can present live, working code that multiple people can inspect, run, and even change (see attached screenshots). As a result of their more graphical and interactive features, Jupyter Notebooks make excellent educational tools, especially for people who are relatively new to code.

In this workshop, I will share some my experiences using Jupyter Notebooks for digital humanities tutorials and scholarship. It will include an overview of what Jupyter Notebooks are and how they work; a brief introduction to Python 3, and how to work with it in a Notebook environment; and some interesting examples of how Jupyter Notebooks can help facilitate writing and sharing digital humanities code (mostly text analysis). Participants need not know anything about Python before participating. In fact, no prior coding experience is necessary, although a quick review of terms like “digital literacy” and “code literacy” would be ideal.


Speakers
ML

Matthew Lavin

University of Pittsburgh


Saturday October 29, 2016 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Center Room 2nd Floor, ELC

1:45pm

#w3: Basic Data Visualization and Scholarship
Basic Data Visualization and Scholarship
Daniel Lynds (St. Norbert College)

This workshop will leverage basic data visualization methods to present social media engagement for #BUDSC16. Measuring hashtag engagement using data visualization is becoming a phenomenon across disciplines and fields, often being integrated with Social Network Analysis. Whether exploring activity of students in a learning environment, engagement of brands with users, actors in a network, or a multitude of other contexts, data visualizing affords us unique areas for collaboration and conversation. This workshop will leverage several approaches of data visualization to present social media engagement for #BUDSC16.

Using hashtags generated for #BUDSC16, this workshop will run before, during, and after the conference while datamining from the various hashtags emerging therein. Participants in this project will use data visualizations to tell stories about their experiences with conference themes and events. During the workshop the main hashtags of the conference will be explored, primarily via twitter, in a hands-on interactive fashion giving participants both theoretical and practical contexts. We will create a unique hashtag in the workshop and watch it grow in a visualized form.

Working in a shared slide deck, participants will openly share the work they make in the workshop. This will be a truly unique experience for participants new to the data visualization field.

Those attending the workshop would benefit most if they have Gmail and Twitter accounts prior to the workshop.

For more on the workshop, see this short video


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Lynds

Daniel Lynds

Instructional Technologist, St Norbert College
Daniel Lynds is an Instructional Technologist at St. Norbert College in the Digital Humanities. With a Bachelor of Fine Art and a Masters in Education Technology, Daniel collaborates with people on making their work as impactful and open as possible. His work centers around digital storytelling, social network analysis, open education, and cultural theory. As an editor at Hybrid Pedagogy, a critical journal/community/conversation/study, Daniel... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Room 241 2nd Floor, ELC

1:45pm

#w4: Crafting Digital Narratives with Scalar
Crafting Digital Narratives with Scalar
Alicia Peaker (Bryn Mawr College)

From non-linear storytelling to rich, scholarly annotations, this workshop will encourage new ways of thinking about writing in digital environments. Using a web application called Scalar, you will begin to craft a media-rich digital narrative. Scalar is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways, including via video and audio annotations.

Requirements: Scalar is browser-based, so all participants need is a laptop, an internet connection, and a browser (ideally other than IE).


Speakers
AP

Alicia Peaker

Bryn Mawr College


Saturday October 29, 2016 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Gallery Theater 3rd Floor, ELC

1:45pm

#w5: Field Trip to the Electronics Maker-E!
Explore Bucknell’s newest makerspace, the Electronics Maker-E! Equipped with a wide range of tools and high tech devices, the Maker-E is a creative space for learning about and working on electronics, programming, and similar projects.

Please meet at the registration table on the 2nd floor of the ELC to walk over to the Maker-E! together.

Moderators
avatar for Kathleen McQuiston

Kathleen McQuiston

Bucknell University

Saturday October 29, 2016 1:45pm - 3:15pm
TBA

3:15pm

Break
Saturday October 29, 2016 3:15pm - 3:30pm
Hallway Outside 241 2nd Floor, ELC

3:30pm

#s3a: Learning through Building: Engaging Students with Digital Collections
Using Digital Collections for Community College Student Research
Elizabeth Huston (Eastfield College) and Cindy Boeke (Southern Methodist University)

Faculty members at Eastfield College are exploring approaches to Digital Humanities (DH) as ways to engage community college students and enhance their learning experiences. In Spring 2016, Eastfield English Professor Elizabeth Huston piloted the use of DH strategies and tools in her English 1302: Composition 2 course, which focuses on writing academic arguments and learning to conduct research. Arguing how the past impacts the present and/or future, students were asked to find one or more pieces in SMU’s CUL Digital Collections, to interpret the digitized item, and to use it as evidence to support their arguments. The success of the project led to discussions between SMU and Eastfield about the potential for a community college DH Practicum, including its planned outcomes, potential pitfalls, and possible use as a scalable model for other community college-university based DH partnerships.


Re-Envisioning Japan: Recuperating Ephemeral Histories through Collaborative Digital Curation, DH Pedagogy, and Web-Based Publication
Joanne Bernardi and Nora Dimmock (University of Rochester)

Re-Envisioning Japan: Japan as Destination in Visual and Material Culture (REJ) is a faculty-library collaboration that models scholarship realized and communicated through creative curation and a multimedia digital archive. This digital archive represents an original collection of tourism, travel and educational ephemera documenting changing representations of Japan and its place in the world in the early to mid 20th century. Grounded in a uniquely syncretic relationship between material and digital worlds, REJ is also a powerful pedagogical tool. We are now finalizing a new Omeka-based site in order to maximize REJ’s scholarly impact with enriched metadata, innovative pathways for interpreting objects, and an open-access, web-based publishing platform promoting multimodal digital scholarship. Our experience designing the digital archive, its use as a teaching tool, and our plans for REJ’s sustainable future provide a useful case study for colleagues working on similar projects in the context of a library digital humanities center. 

Moderators
avatar for Matt Gardzina

Matt Gardzina

Director, Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship, Bucknell University
As Director of Digital Pedagogy & Scholarship at Bucknell University I am responsible for providing leadership, direction, planning, and oversight for the wide-range of outreach, consultation, instruction and support programs of the Educational Technology work group including digital pedagogy, digital scholarship, and focused programs in GIS and video. | | I came to Bucknell from The College of Wooster where I served as Director of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Bernardi

Joanne Bernardi

Associate Professor, University of Rochester
My research and teaching focus on Japanese cinema and culture, particularly after 1900; popular culture; the history and historiography of moving images and other visual media; material culture studies; and critical digital humanities practice. I'm author and editor of Re-Envisioning Japan, an ongoing digital humanities project comprising a physical collection and critical digital archive that documents changing images of Japan and its place in... Read More →
ND

Nora Dimmock

University of Rochester
avatar for Elizabeth Huston

Elizabeth Huston

Eastfield College
Please talk with me about using DH projects for students and for me, about DH tools and methods that work well with students in the classroom, about starting and managing a DH program at a college, about DH grants (both NEH and other than NEH), about anything DH--I am here to learn!
IZ

Iskandar Zulkarnain

University of Rochester


Saturday October 29, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Walls Lounge 2nd Floor, ELC

3:30pm

#s3b: Archiving Collective Memory
Shaping the Future by Engaging the Past: Preserving the Stories of a Discarded Symbol
Rob Sieczkiewicz, Ryan Ake, Rachel Baer, and Jess Deibert (Susquehanna University)

If history is written by the victors, what can students learn from hearing the stories of the other side? When an institution changes its identity to reflect contemporary values, how does a community preserve its discarded traditions?

In 2015, Susquehanna University’s Board of Trustees decided to replace the ‘Crusader’ mascot and nickname, which had been used since 1924. Explaining the rationale for the change, SU President Jay Lemons noted that a university mascot and nickname “should be beloved and unifying symbols,” which the Crusader was not. While some members of the SU community saw the changes as an opportunity to create a more inspiring and unifying iconography, others passionately disagreed with the decision.

Susquehanna students negotiated this divide between administration and alumni/ae through the Crusader History Harvest. This Harvest, modeled on the History Harvests of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, was a one-day event, held during homecoming weekend, that invited alumni/ae to bring their Crusader memorabilia back to campus. Students digitized those objects and interviewed the alums, asking about the objects’ meaning to their owners. Presenting the digitized objects and the interviews in an open access online archive offers a glimpse of the power of digital storytelling to bridge the divide between tradition and progress.

In this presentation, Susquehanna students and librarians will address some of the issues raised by the Crusader History Harvest such as how students learn by documenting history as it is being made and how a community preserves its traditions while managing necessary change.


The Discordant Harmony of Distributed Knowledge. The Yale Community Voices Archive
Carol Chiodo, Michael Lotstein, Monica Ong, Douglas Duhaime (Yale University)

How do you build consensus around establishing an institutional archive which seeks to record voices of discord? How might multiple stakeholders strongly disagree, and still work together to record that disagreement?  This presentation outlines the blueprint of a distributed knowledge model used to create the prototype for the Yale Community Voices Archive (YCVA). The model prioritizes creating a core team of stakeholders, identifying their concerns, and then iterating to generate consensus.

The archive, now up and running, gathers, organizes and preserves a wide array of born digital materials representing community perspectives on activism for racial justice on campus. Community sourced accessioning facilitates the collection of crucial contextual materials that will help future students and scholars interpret and understand current campus discussions of race, ethnicity, and social justice. The project responds both to the students’ use of social media for chronicling and debating these events as well as the Yale University Archives’ seeking a user-friendly means of collecting and preserving digital content.

Through this distributed knowledge model, the YCVA doesn’t simply create a space in the archive for underrepresented communities. It asks them to frame their own historical records, to tell their own stories, and to participate in the crucial processes of digital archival design and accession.


Circulation and Use of Indigenous Language Texts in New England
N. C. Christopher Couch (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Religious materials in New England created by John Eliot and his informants are believed to have played a role in extending secular literacy in indigenous languages in Massachusetts and beyond. Printed and manuscript materials are studied as preserved materials in repositories, but they circulated in various spheres in Colonial and early National New England. A sampling inventory of remaining documents combined with information on provenance and ownership could be mapped against the continued use of indigenous languages, the location of communities of “praying Indians” and early reservations to suggest the ways in which such works were used in a variety of communities using GIS or Google-map based software. Such an analysis would move us closer to an understanding of these books and broadsides as circulating, used works, and each remaining copy could contribute to our understanding of the role they played in literacy and language.  A second stage of the project might compare the circulation and use of printed and manuscript materials created by missionaries like Bernardino de Sahagun in indigenous language for conversion uses, including teaching doctrine, theatricals, and public prayer in New Spain (Mexico). questions that would not arise from examining either context alone. I would hope explore parallels between the role of indigenous literacy, fostered by missionary activity but extending far beyond “religious” contexts, in the creation of solidarity within Native communities in New Spain and New England.


Moderators
PJ

Prof. John Hunter

Senior Fellow, Humanities

Speakers
RA

Ryan Ake

Outreach & Collection Development Librarian, Susquehanna University
RB

Rachel Baer

Susquehanna University
CC

Carol Chiodo

Yale University
NC

N. C. Christopher Couch

University of Massachusetss Amherst
JD

Jessica Deibert

Susquehanna University
avatar for Rob Sieczkiewicz

Rob Sieczkiewicz

Susquehanna University


Saturday October 29, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Center Room 2nd Floor, ELC

3:30pm

#s3c: Evaluating the role of Digital Scholarship in Higher Education
The Know-How and the Know-What: Reflections on the Intersection of Library Science Education and Digital Humanities Initiatives
Joseph Koivisto (University of Maryland)

Project-based learning, tool-oriented workshops, and graduate assistantships are frequently upheld as a practical approach to integrating LIS graduate students in digital humanities research, but to what degree do these practices prepare students for critical DH engagement? Reflecting on the recent completion of graduate coursework at the Catholic University of America’s MSLIS program, this presentation will provide a personal narrative of library professional education specifically tailored to address areas relevant to the digital humanities: cultural heritage preservation and digital libraries systems and management. By additionally addressing participation in early-stage digital humanities initiatives, the presentation will critically evaluate the relevance of digitally-oriented coursework to actual readiness to support interdisciplinary research in team-based settings. Lastly, the presentation will provide a critical assessment of labor inherent in student participation in project-based learning, crowdsourcing, and research models that integrate graduate labor – paid or otherwise – into the production of digital scholarly work.


The Public Face of Private Scholarship: The Drew University Graduate History Podcasting Project
Anne Ricculli (Drew University)

In the spring of 2016, Drew University convened a Graduate Student Digital Advisory Committee tasked with identifying digital skills required by modern graduate students to support humanities research, writing, and presentations. Faced with uncertain job markets, Drew takes seriously the imperative to prepare graduate students for careers both within the academy and beyond these institutional boundaries. With the dual mission of “putting the humanities to work,” and addressing “the urgent challenges of our time with rigorous, independent, and imaginative thought,” the Committee embarked on a Podcasting project.

Podcasting is a key communication method and a critical tool for today’s historians and public intellectuals. This project seeks to cultivate in graduate students an attitude towards scholarship that incorporates the public value of what we do.

This presentation will discuss this work in-progress, from inception to current status, with the challenges, pitfalls, and triumphs inherent in this digital collaboration. Consistent with the conference theme of “Negotiating Borders,” we argue that the process of identifying digital initiatives that minimize the boundary between theory and practice enhances graduate student education, providing opportunities to implement and assess effective public engagement.


Student Writing as Digital Humanities Method
Mackenzie Brooks and Brandon Walsh (Washington and Lee University)

Whether it is a blog post, a journal article, a Hypothes.is comment, or a README.md file, writing is a fundamental digital humanities and digital scholarship activity. We encourage undergraduates to pursue DH to improve their technology and research skills, but often neglect to include writing in the list of transferable skills. Encouraging students to write in public asks them to think about themselves as contributors to ongoing conversations about the critical use of technology. Far from presenting public writing as a utopian ideal, by discussing copyright and licensing, professional identities, and more with our students, we can help them better understand the risks and affordances of the work we ask them to do. In this presentation, we will share several methods used in our DH program to help students build the skills necessary to publish writing on the Web.


Moderators
TB

Thomas Beasley

Bucknell University

Speakers
MB

Mackenzie Brooks

Digital Humanities Librarian, Washington and Lee University
JK

Joseph Koivisto

University of Maryland
AR

Anne Ricculli

Drew University
BW

Brandon Walsh

Washington and Lee University


Saturday October 29, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 241 2nd Floor, ELC

5:00pm

Cocktail Hour, Poster and Digital Demonstration Session
ACRL Framework Poster Cross-Institutional Collaboration
Jill Hallam-Miller, Nancy Frazier, and Ben Hoover (Bucknell University)

Digital History in Iraq and the US: International Collaborative Student Research
Elizabeth Campbell (Daemen College)

Creating an Online Environment for Displaying Historic Pennsylvania German Texts
Michael McGuire (Indiana University)

The Evolution of Student Political Engagement at Lafayette College
Caroline Nawrocki (Lafayette College)

Topic Modeling the U.S. Supreme Court
William Gordon (Lafayette College)

Synth Guide: An Interactive Digital Narrative
John Gossick (Lafayette College)

The Hadhrami Diaspora: Islam and Indian Ocean Connectivity
Tawfiq Alhamedi (Lafayette College)

Visualizing Networks in the Ancient Mediterranean
Tom Beasley and Sune Swart (Bucknell University)

Runoff Flow Path Mapping at Bucknell--Research, Classroom, and Community Perspectives
Rich Crago, Janine Glathar, Luyang Ren, and Chanda Singoyi (Bucknell University)

Infographics for Service Learning and Digital Literacy
Alexis Henshaw (Miami University) and Jill Hallam-Miller (Bucknell University)

Engaging Student in Global Issues through the Use of Media Tools
Kathe Lehman-Meyer, Cathy Whitlow, Mary Lynne Hill, Teresa Van Hoy, and Kathleen Gallagher (St. Mary's University)

Crossing Institutional Boundaries to Create a Collaborative Digital Archives: The Collegewomen.org Project
Eric Pumroy (Bryn Mawr College), Joanna DiPasquale (Vassar College), and Beth Seltzer (Bryn Mawr College)

Hello Coed! A 1950s History of Gettysburg College Women
Keira Koch (Gettysburg College)

Your Friend and Classmate: Following the West Point Class of June 1861 Through the American Civil War
Julia Wall (Gettysburg College)

This is Why We Fight: Student Activism at Gettysburg College
Lauren White (Gettysburg College)

Erasing Borders Through Digital Discovery: EXPLORE Chicago Collections as the Foundation for Collaboration Among Libraries, Archives, Museums (and Others)
Tracy J. Seneca (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Developing a Documentary on Immigrant Faith Cultures
Alf Siewers and Sasha Weilbaker (Bucknell University)

Reading without Words: Analyzing Films through Colors and Images using Indexed Histograms
John Hunter and Dale Hartman (Bucknell University)

Speakers
TA

Tawfiq Alhamedi

Lafayette College
TB

Thomas Beasley

Bucknell University
EC

Elizabeth Campbell

Daemen College
JD

Joanna DiPasquale

Vassar College
NF

Nancy Frazier

Bucknell University
KG

Kathleen Gallagher

St. Mary's University
JG

Janine Glathar

Bucknell University
WG

Will Gordon

Lafayette College
JG

Johnny Gossick

Lafayette College
DH

Dale Hartman

Bucknell University
AH

Alexis Henshaw

Miami University
ML

Mary Lynne Hill

St. Mary's University
BH

Benjamin Hoover

Bucknell University
PJ

Prof. John Hunter

Senior Fellow, Humanities
KK

Keira Koch

Gettysburg College
avatar for Kathe Lehman-Meyer

Kathe Lehman-Meyer

Director, Academic Media Center, St. Mary's University-San Antonio
I'm passionate about creativity and working with color. Very much enjoy storytelling via any medium. Find it very life giving to spend 90% of my time working within my areas of strength and spend as little time as possible working in the areas where I lack talent. Spare time is spent in prayer, with family and reading... especially home decorating and improvement blogs.
MM

Michael McGuire

Bucknell University
CN

Caroline Nawrocki

Lafayette College
EP

Eric Pumroy

Bryn Mawr College
avatar for Luyang Ren

Luyang Ren

GIS/Web Application Specialist, Bucknell University
Talk with me about GIS
BS

Beth Seltzer

Bryn Mawr College
avatar for Tracy Seneca

Tracy Seneca

University of Illinois at Chicago
PA

Prof. Alf Siewers

Senior Fellow, Environmental
JW

Julia Wall

Gettysburg College
LW

Lauren White

Gettysburg College
CW

Cathy Whitlow

St. Mary's University


Saturday October 29, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Terrace Room Second Floor, ELC
 
Sunday, October 30
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Sunday October 30, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am
Terrace Room Second Floor, ELC

8:30am

#s4a: Collaborating, Publishing, and Community Participation
The Archive as a Collaborative Research and Digital Publication Laboratory
Neal Harmeyer, Tracy Grimm, and Lauren Haslem (Purdue University)

Archivists from Purdue University Archives and Special Collections, embedded within honors courses, recently completed pilot phases of two projects aimed at online dissemination of student scholarly research. Project goals were to increase our own understanding of digital scholarship management, to provide students experience in the scholarly publication cycle, to strengthen our collaborative efforts with faculty, and finally, to enhance exposure of Archives and Special Collections as a center for student research and scholarship. Outcomes included many successes, some failures, and opportunities to refine the archives-led digital scholarship process. In this talk, we will discuss the investments necessary by the archivists, faculty, and student staff; share outcomes both positive and negative from the experience, including barriers discovered in the process; and provide our own rubric for bridging the divide between diverse partners within the academy—students, professional staff, and faculty—for successful integration of archival instruction and digital scholarship.


Reading Moravian Lives: Overcoming Challenges in Transcribing and Digitizing Archival Memoirs
Katherine Faull, Diane Jakacki, and Michael McGuire (Bucknell University)

The Moravian Lives project aims to digitize, transcribe, and publish for analysis more than 60,000 manuscript and print memoirs, written by members of the Moravian Church between 1750-2012. These memoirs are housed in archives throughout the world, making it difficult for scholars to engage with them as an entire corpus. Furthermore, of the 18th century memoirs, over 90% are in manuscript form. As project collaborators establish the foundations of a massive digital archive that houses facsimiles of the memoirs, we wrestle with how best to publish the memoirs in machine-readable format: existing optical character recognition (OCR) software does not reliably manage 18th century German script; in addition, the volume of pages to be transcribed challenges traditional transcription capabilities. Research teams at Bucknell and the University of Gothenburg in Sweden are collaborating to develop a suite of tools that will support large-scale controlled crowdsourcing of transcription and exportation of text and data sets to support a wide range of research needs by scholars in fields ranging from autobiography to theology, religious history, social history, historical and computational linguistics, and gender studies. In this paper members of the Bucknell team, led by Katie Faull, will discuss the challenges we face as we establish best practice for developing an interactive platform for editing and accessing this critically significant collection.


Moderators
avatar for Kathleen McQuiston

Kathleen McQuiston

Bucknell University

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Katherine Faull

Prof. Katherine Faull

Senior Fellow, Languages & Cultures
avatar for Tracy Grimm

Tracy Grimm

Barron Hilton Archivist for Flight and Space Exploration, Purdue University
Tracy Grimm is the Barron Hilton Archivist for Flight and Space Exploration at Purdue University Libraries' Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center. She manages and develops the Barron Hilton Flight and Space Exploration Archives which holds the personal papers of pioneering aviators, astronauts and engineers including Amelia Earhart and Neil Armstrong. In collaboration with Purdue faculty she has developed and been embedded in... Read More →
avatar for Neal Harmeyer

Neal Harmeyer

Digital Archivist, Purdue University
I am a digital archivist within Archives and Special Collections at Purdue University. I like to work collaboratively with faculty and staff within campus units and departments to generate course instruction material using archival materials. One of my primary interests is facilitating greater community understanding of archives and special collections and their potential research and educational values. l also coordinates digitization and... Read More →
LH

Lauren Haslem

Purdue University
DJ

Diane Jakacki

Bucknell University
MM

Michael McGuire

Bucknell University


Sunday October 30, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Walls Lounge 2nd Floor, ELC

8:30am

#s4b: Changing Perceptions of Digital Scholarship and Pedagogy
Folie à plusieurs: Actual, Aspirational, and Abstracted Digital Scholarship
Jacob Heil (Five Colleges of Ohio)

For the last three years the libraries of the Ohio Five Colleges of Ohio have been collaborating under the auspices of a digital scholarship grant from the Mellon Foundation. At its core, the grant is designed to help faculty build digital pedagogical projects; to-date we have developed upwards of thirty such projects ranging from the launch of a student journal to the launch of a web-app. The guiding question of the grant has been: how do we leverage the resources of the consortium to accommodate large-scale digital scholarship? We have learned — or may be learning — that this is not a question of resource management, but rather one of building the culture out of which such projects might grow organically.

In this presentation I share some of Ohio Five’s achievements in the first three years of the grant: roughly standardized project development workflows, consortial communication efforts, and the meaningful involvement of student specialists in a variety of ways. I hope that others might find these descriptions useful. Additionally, I hope to encourage conversation about digital scholarship that is necessarily un-centered — the five colleges are separated by 100 miles, end to end — but that nonetheless relies upon the kinds of collaboration that are orchestrated at the level of superstructure. Is the mere notion of “the Center” — the center as merely an abstraction — enough to overcome institutionalized borders that might be departmental, bureaucratic, and/or cultural?


Reproducing and Disrupting Phallogocentrism in Computer Coding Languages
Sandra Nelson (University of Pittsburgh)

Stemming from the assumption that a computer program’s entire meaning is its function, the coding language used to compose it typically regarded as axiomatic and arhetorical. This approach is potentially problematic because it fails to address the ideological elements that are implicitly conveyed and reproduced through these languages. In this paper, I identify the linguistic elements of coding languages and analyze them through the concept of phallogocentrism in order to argue that through both their social reception and their structure they reproduce Western patriarchal ideas. Then, drawing on feminist and queer theory, I propose various structural, formal, pedagogical, and hermeneutical methods of disrupting this process. By deconstructing the patriarchal aspects of code, I present one method for critiquing and expanding the borders that dictate access to creating, controlling, and communicating with digital technology and gesture toward the possibility of redistributing the power aligned with these abilities.

The Problem of the Transnational in Digital Scholarship
Emily McGinn (University of Georgia)

My current research project looks at networks of transnational exchange in literary periodicals in the modernist era (1890-1930). Using data from the Modernist Journals Project as well as data from continental European and Latin American magazines, I am looking specifically for translators, those who are not necessarily reflected in the annals of literary history, but whose contributions made possible a global exchange of literature and theories of modernity. The project follows major periodical studies scholars like Suzanne Churchill and Adam McKible in identifying the collective elements of the production and dissemination of these magazines that includes the economic and distribution systems that help circulate these magazines beyond national borders and regional territories and that rely on the global marketplace for their cultivation.

Yet in exploring this network of contributors in a digital context, this project lays bare the complexities of working in digital sphere dominated by English. From formatting datasets in multiple languages, navigating international copyright laws, and gaining access to texts and databases, to finding tools that can properly handle accent marks and non-English grammars, the obstacles begin to overwhelm the possibilities of this work. While DH and web culture in general profess to increase accessibility and offer a new global interconnectivity, the same issues of canon formation, linguistic access, and international law that have already ossified the academy are replicated in data structures. These structures are often invisible in the final product of DH work, assumed to be neutral elements of computing. This project will make these issues visible, exploring the limits and potentialities of multilingual, transnational DH work.


Moderators
CC

C. Cymone Fourshey

Bucknell University

Speakers
avatar for Jacob Heil

Jacob Heil

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Dir. of CoRE, College of Wooster
College of Wooster
avatar for Emily McGinn

Emily McGinn

Digital Humanities Coordinator, University of Georgia
SN

Sandra Nelson

University of Pittsburgh


Sunday October 30, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Room 241 2nd Floor, ELC

10:00am

Break
Sunday October 30, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Hallway Outside 241 2nd Floor, ELC

10:30am

#s5a: Negotiating Social Justice through Digital Engagement
‘It’s a Revolving Door’: Rethinking the Borders of Carceral Spaces
Vanessa Massaro (Bucknell University)

This paper explores the use of digital scholarship to understand the porous boundaries of the prison. I argue that the boundaries of a carceral landscape must be expanded to include the neighborhoods of incarceration. The consequences of an ever expanding prison industrial complex, including its perpetuation of racism and the “warehousing” of a surplus population are not distributed evenly across people and places. Rather, the experience of the prison industrial complex is uneven, impacting some communities much more than others. Yet, little work on the human experience of incarceration has considered the carceral experiences of the places that supply prisoners in the US. Specifically, this paper shows how neighborhoods like Grays Ferry, where most of the population is poor, African-American and under correctional supervision, are part of carceral space. Grays Ferry is one of many neighborhoods where the places and practices of incarceration extend beyond the prison walls to affect everyday life.  This paper builds on scholarship that exposes the expanding importance of the incarceration-business within a wider national and international context of militarization and prison-industrialization. My work builds upon this literature to show how incarceration works into the daily life and community spaces in inner city Philadelphia. In so doing, the paper draws on my ongoing use of digital scholarship tools to study the expansion of carceral spaces beyond bounded institutions and demonstrates how these spaces materialize through daily practice within the communities most affected by the criminalization and policing of the informal economy.



Seeking Social Justice in the Digital Age: A Praxis-Oriented Approach to Community-Based Learning and Offender Reentry
Stephen Barnard (St. Lawrence University)

This presentation explores the pedagogy and praxis of a digital, sociological approach to community-based learning (CBL).  Through a close examination of experiences planning and teaching a course tailored to fit the needs of a county jail, I demonstrate a model for teaching CBL that serves the community as well as the students.  After reviewing the process of conducting a needs-assessment and designing programming appropriate for the cooperating institution, I discuss strategies for crafting appropriate course curricula.  The combination of individual (reflective blogging and experiential research) and collaborative assignments (community improvement project, group discussion facilitations, and presentations) provides a diverse yet sequenced set of assessments, which approach community engagement from a variety of angles.  The success of this CBL approach is shown through examples from students’ reflective blog posts as well as feedback from members of the cooperating institution.


Moderators
KM

Karen M Morin

Bucknell University

Speakers
SB

Stephen Barnard

St. Lawrence University
VM

Vanessa Massaro

Bucknell University


Sunday October 30, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Walls Lounge 2nd Floor, ELC

10:30am

#s5b: Exploring Community through Digital Scholarship
Digital Storytelling as a Tool to Preserve the History of the Williamsport Black Community
Amy Rogers and Lynn Estomin (Lycoming College)

During the spring 2016 semester, two professors from diverse educational backgrounds, a group of freshmen from all over the United States, and 15 African American community members from Williamsport, Pennsylvania, came together to create a digital archive of stories documenting the history of the Black community of Lycoming County.

Digital storytelling is a specific process combining storytelling with modern-day technology and digital media based on participants’ own experiences and told through their own perspectives. Participants’ voices are recorded and integrated with photographs, letters, home videos, etc. The stories focus on the point of view/voice of the storyteller and value the power of story as a tool for self-discovery and reflection, community building and education, organizing and advocacy.

Through this interactive presentation, we will demonstrate how we used digital storytelling to increase knowledge and understanding of this mainly undocumented community history. The presenters will share the process used in this collaborative project.  We will talk about some of the challenges presented by the project, as well as the successful outcome — the creation of digitalized stories of the life stories of members of the diverse African American community. The final stories were presented at a public screening and will be available to the public through the Lycoming County Historical Society, the Lycoming County Women’s History Collection and the Heart of Williamsport Project.

The presenters will discuss the value of a first year seminar that connects students from Lycoming College to the local community.  The relationships formed between the Lycoming College students and their community members were lifelong partnerships, as shared by a student and her community partner who will share their story as part of our presentation.  The first year seminar course had three main parts — creation of the student’s own digital stories, learning about the history of Lycoming County and its African American community, and the collaborative effort by students and community member teams to create a series of historical stories about the local Black community.   Community members shared photographs, correspondence, diaries, scrapbooks, newspaper stories, and in some instances, rare secondary sources and students created 3-5 minute digital stories about some aspect of their partners’ lives and community.

Digitizing Appalachia: Collaborating with Local Institutions and Harnessing Omeka to Capture Southern Appalachia’s Cultural Heritage
Pamela Mitchem and Dea Rice (Appalachian State University)

Appalachian State University is a regional comprehensive university serving over 17,000 students and employing close to 900 faculty. The Carol Grotnes Belk Library and Information Commons endeavors to cultivate an environment where people discover, create and share information that reflects the acquisition of 21st century knowledge and skills. We are active partners in advancing the University’s principles of sustainability, social justice, inclusion, and global citizenship. The library’s newly developed Digital Scholarship and Initiatives (DSI) team began serving the university on July 1, 2015. Our team is dedicated to fostering the creation, dissemination, and preservation of digital scholarship and digital objects.

One of our main initiatives is creating sustainable partnerships with local cultural heritage organizations to build digital collections related to the culture and history of southern Appalachia. Using Omeka, an open source content management software, we are helping our historical societies, museums, local libraries, and school alumni associations to create digital collections of their historical materials. We use Omeka content management software for Appalachian’s Special Collections materials as well. We also helped create the Digital Library of Southern Appalachia Web Portal to promote these collections. Some of our projects include:

 

  • Blowing Rock History Project—A collaborative project with Blowing Rock Historical Society and Blowing Rock Art & History Museum. DSI provided consultation and training on Omeka software and will be writing a collaborative grant to digitize Blowing Rock related materials.
  • Digital History Class—DSI worked with the history department to provide training to students on Omeka for their Digital History class. These students then created Omeka collections for three local cultural organizations. One of those organizations was Lincoln Heights Recreation Committee. Lincoln Heights is a large Rosenwald school for African Americans in Wilkesboro, NC. Open from 1924-­68, Lincoln Heights educated and employed black southerners through the Jim Crow Era and the height of the 20th-century Civil Rights Movement.
  • Digital Watauga Project—We are collaborating to provide Omeka training and digitization support to the Digital Watauga project, which is funded by Library Services and Technology ACT (LSTA) to digitize historical documents and images donated by community members.

 

This presentation will present a case study of our collaborations and use of Omeka. We will discuss strategies for partnerships, the challenges and rewards to cultivating these important relationships, and lessons learned in the process. We will also discuss our training module for Omeka.


The Anthracite Coal Region of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Using Facebook to Document a Community
Jennie Levine Knies (Penn State Wilkes-Barre) and Melissa R. Meade (Temple University)

In 2013, Temple University PhD candidate Melissa R. Meade started a Facebook page for the Anthracite Coal Region of Northeastern Pennsylvania, to share and curate material relevant to her community-based ethnographic dissertation project. The page has evolved into a place in which community members meet and gather digitally to reflect upon history, memories, culture, and media of the greater Anthracite Region. While Facebook practically serves as an excellent platform for communication, it is not symbiotic for necessary cataloging, searching, and archiving of information. The Anthracite Coal Region of Northeastern Pennsylvania is a work in progress with endless possibilities. For this talk, we intend to focus on a description of the Facebook page and community, and discuss our attempts to extract data, our ideas of how we might use that data to further scholarship and understanding of the history of the region, and discuss challenges in bridging these divides.


Moderators
AS

Andrew Stuhl

Bucknell University

Speakers
LE

Lynn Estomin

Lycoming College
JK

Jennie Knies

Penn State Wilkes-Barre
MM

Melissa Meade

Temple University
PM

Pamela Mitchem

Appalachian State University
avatar for Dea Rice

Dea Rice

Metadata Librarian, Appalachian State
AR

Amy Rogers

Lycoming College


Sunday October 30, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 241 2nd Floor, ELC